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COVID-19: Slight increase in the number of infections and hospitalisations

The public health science institute Sciensano has released the latest figures on the novel coronavirus pandemic in Belgium. They show slight increases in the 7-day rolling averages for hospitalisations and people testing positive for the virus. Meanwhile the number of deaths among people with COVID-19 continues to fall. 

During the week from 30 January to 5 February an average of 124 people with COVID-19 were hospitalised each day. This is up 3% on the 7-day rolling average of 120 hospitalisation/day during the previous week (23 to 29 January). On Friday 5 February 134 patients with COVID-19 were admitted to the country’s hospitals, this is down 5 on Thursday’s figures. 150 patients were discharged on Friday, bringing the total number of patients with COVID-19 that are being treated in Belgian hospitals to 1,736. Of these 304 are on intensive care wards and 168 are on ventilators.

During the week from 27 January to 2 February an average of 41 people with COVID-19 died each day in Belgium. This is down 19% on the 7-day rolling average of 50 COVID-19 deaths/day during the previous week (20 to 26 January).

During the week from 27 January to 2 February an average of 2,348 people tested positive for coronavirus each day. This is a rise of 4% on the 7-day rolling average for the previous week. However, the rate of increase is slowing. There are big regional differences with the number of people testing positive for coronavirus increasing far quicker in Wallonia that it is in Flanders.

Between 27 January and 2 February an average of 51,000 people were tested for coronavirus each day. This is 11% up on the previous week. Of those tested 5.5% tested positive for coronavirus.

On 4 February (the last day for which figures are available) 318,048 Belgium had already received their first dose of coronavirus vaccine. This is 3.45% of the adult population. 63,177 people in Belgium have already received their second dose of the vaccine. 

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